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Cyber Security

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Cybersecurity in the US

January 19, 2023 09:52 PM
Cyber-attacks on critical U.S. infrastructure pose a tremendous threat to the American population and government. For years, the threat has grown in the form of state-sponsored cyber attackers and threats via data mining and malware coming through applications and social media. The current United States infrastructure is not sufficiently prepared or resilient to withstand attacks that can cause damage to critical segments of the medical, financial, power, and governmental sectors. Experts suggest that radical updates to infrastructure and improved security practices are required to prepare adequately for state-sponsored attacks or undermining from near-peer rivals.
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Monthly Archives: October 2019

To Preserve National Security, U.S. Should Support Budapest Convention

June 19, 2021 04:07 PM
Based on the rules Russia has proposed that oppose the Budapest Convention, the United States should continue to support the international collaboration within the Budapest Convention. The United States currently is involved in maintaining the balance between upholding its own cybersecurity laws and helping other countries uphold theirs. By keeping the Budapest Convention in place, the United States would continue to enforce its cybersecurity laws, which are necessary as it is one of the countries most affected by cybercrime (Peters). Maintaining these laws would also take away power from Russia and China, as they would allow continued access to international networks for monitoring and criminal activity tracking purposes. Russia and China both want to take more domestic control over Internet access by censoring and cutting off access to their Internet, and such policies threaten U.S. national security (Morgan, Ayres).
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Cybersecurity: Closing the Back Door to America's Enemies

April 27, 2021 09:13 AM
On October 25, 2012, The New York Times published an eye-opening report on an extensive, billion-dollar business empire constructed by relatives of China’s prime minister, Wen Jiabao. Three months later, the Times revealed it had been undergoing intense cyber attacks even before the report was publicly released. Cooperating with AT&T, the FBI, and a leading cybersecurity firm, the Times pinned the digital break-ins on Chinese hackers, adding that the Chinese military was likely involved.
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Monthly Archives: September 2018

US Cyber Capabilities Are More Potent Than They Seem

September 23, 2018 05:48 PM
The United States has been warned of a “cyber-Pearl Harbor” for years. Earlier in 2018, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats announced that “the lights are blinking red.”[1] Russia’s attempts at interference in U.S. elections has already been confirmed by the U.S. intelligence community, and the theft of American intellectual property is a daily occurrence. The world is already “weaponizing the Internet,” and the United States needs to adapt or lose its edge.[2]
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Monthly Archives: September 2018

Cyber Threats to the United States

September 15, 2018 05:24 PM
Cyber warfare[1] is the most dangerous threat America faces today.[2] The U.S. Government has identified three major cyber threats to the American way of life: China, Russia, and Iran.[3] These nations have consistently attacked American industry, threatening the United States’ economic security. These attacks are occurring on a daily basis with the express purpose of “[exploiting] America’s openness in order to undermine our long-term competitive advantage.”[4] America is also vulnerable to non-state actors using cyber capabilities to challenge America’s interests. While no non-state actor has yet to conduct a major cyber attack on the United States, America’s online infrastructure is still vulnerable to attacks from state and non-state actors alike.
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Monthly Archives: October 2013

The State of American Cyber Security

October 31, 2013 04:23 PM
America’s cyber security situation is in disarray. Ironically, the most technologically advanced country in the world is struggling mightily to protect itself and its interests in the digital domain. Recent events show that the pervasiveness and complexity of cyber threats are growing. At the same time, American cyber security efforts have been severely restricted by domestic and foreign political pressures. These pressures have left the United States more vulnerable to cyber attacks. If these trends continue, America will face increasingly serious threats from state actors and even more serious threats from non-state actors like terrorists.
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